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Nicole Wilson

Wilson_Headshot

Research Interests:

Global Environmental Change, Indigenous governance, Indigenous Epistemologies and Ontologies, Political Ecology, Water Governance, Arctic Social Science

 Biography:

Nicole J. Wilson is a scholar of settler origin whose work examines Indigenous peoples’ relationships to water and water governance in the context of settler colonialism and environmental change, with an emphasis on Arctic and sub-Arctic regions of North America. She holds an M.S. in Natural Resources from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in Resource Management and Environmental Studies from the University of British Columbia (UBC). Her doctoral research examined the role of First Nations in water governance in the context of modern land claim agreements in Yukon, Canada. She is currently a Mitacs Elevate post-doctoral fellow at the Peter A. Allard School of Law at UBC where she is conducting community-based research with Carcross/Tagish First Nation.

Select Publications

Wilson, N.J., Harris, L.M., Joseph-Rear, A., Beaumont, J., Satterfield, T., 2019. Water is Medicine: Reimagining Water Security through Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Relationships to Treated and Traditional Water Sources in Yukon, Canada. Water 11, 624. https://doi.org/10.3390/w11030624

Wilson, N.J., Inkster, J., 2018. Respecting water: Indigenous water governance, ontologies, and the politics of kinship on the ground. Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space 1–23. https://doi.org/10.1177/2514848618789378

Wilson, N.J., Mutter, E., Inkster, J., Satterfield, T., 2018. Community-Based Monitoring as the practice of Indigenous governance: A case study of Indigenous-led water quality monitoring in the Yukon River Basin. Journal of Environmental Management 210, 290–298. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2018.01.020

Wilson, N.J., 2014. Indigenous water governance: Insights from the hydrosocial relations of the Koyukon Athabascan village of Ruby, Alaska. Geoforum 57, 1–11. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2014.08.005

Wilson, N.J., 2014. The Politics of Adaptation: Subsistence Livelihoods and Vulnerability to Climate Change in the Koyukon Athabascan Village of Ruby, Alaska. Hum Ecol 42, 87–101. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10745-013-9619-3

Contact:

n.wilson(at)alumni.ubc.ca

Follow Nicole Wilson at Academia.edu or Research Gate or visit her personal website www.nicolejwilson.net

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